Determine the utility of standardized terminology and nomenclature in nursing informatics

Determine the utility of standardized terminology and nomenclature in nursing informatics

Order Description

Derived from your healthcare experience, determine the utility of standardized terminology and
nomenclature in nursing informatics from an advanced nursing practice perspective

Introduction
Part of managing technological change, as defined by Lorenzi and Riley (2010), is understanding
unique aspects of nursing informatics and its application to the healthcare environment. Similarly,
a function of expert nursing practice is a commitment to change that is evidenced across nursing
specialties and practice environments (Morrison &Symes, 2011). It is important for the DNP-prepared
nurse to become familiar with nursing informatics language, because it will be increasingly used in
future advanced nursing practice. The DNP-prepared nurse will benefit from establishing a
relationship with an informatics nurse specialist who serves in one of the many roles emerging in
this new and dynamic specialty. However, the DNP-prepared nurse must first become acquainted with
some unique principles to nursing informatics.
Reflection
Take a moment to reflect on a nursing language used in your advanced nursing practice or in the
practice of other DNP-prepared nurses. Is the language recognized and/or shared by nurses beyond
your practice environment? If not, has interprofessional collaboration or communication suffered?
Nursing Informatics Nomenclature
A systematic approach to naming is known as a nomenclature. Such terms are typically elaborated
according to a preestablished set of rules. Examples of nursing nomenclatures that are important to
the advanced nursing practice role include SNO-MED and ICNP© (Coenen& Kim, 2010).
Nursing Informatics Taxonomy
Advanced nursing practice has also identified a need to provide leadership in the design of
national or large patient care datasets and related standardized languages for use in such systems
as the electronic health record (Fetter, 2009a, 2009b). At the level of the DNP-prepared nurse, an
understanding and an ability to exercise the distinct criteria for such languages are consistent
with the move of our current advanced nursing practice environment toward the unique terms in
language systems that will contribute to multipurpose data and information. Informatics nurse
specialists have further documented standardized nursing-language contributions in realizing the
goals of a reference terminology of unique terms through the development of information systems
that are capable of increased interprofessional collaboration between healthcare administration,
information scientists, and providers of care.
Such examples include the following.
1. NANDA: North American Nursing Diagnosis Association
2. NMDS: Nursing Minimum Data Set
3. NIC and NOC: Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification
(NOC)
4. HHCC: Home Healthcare Classification
5. OMAHA system
6. PCDS: Patient Care Data Set

Nursing Research: A Tool for Action
NANDA Anecdotal ExemplarNMDS Anecdotal Exemplar NIC/NOC Anecdotal ExemplarHHCC and OMAHA System
Anecdotal ExemplarsPCDS Anecdotal Exemplar

Review the following interactive activities to learn more about the examples listed above.

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Determine the utility of standardized terminology and nomenclature in nursing informatics
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